Research - American Chiropractic Association

Developing Person-Centeredness: A Continual Process

Person-centeredness is an approach to health care focused on the person, placing high importance on things such as being respectful and responsive to individual preferences, needs and values. Practitioners who adopt this approach to care report that it can transform the doctor-patient encounter and even re-energize providers. The path to patient-centeredness, however, is not always a natural one for doctors, many of whom report that they must continually work to adopt and refine this style of patient care. Learn what you can do to begin moving toward a more patient-centered approach in your practice.

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Article rating: 5.0

A Heavy Subject: The Impact of Weightlifting on Young Spines

Is weightlifting safe for adolescents? No, well yes, okay maybe…in the right situations.  That is about as clear as it gets concerning the growing epidemic of adolescent injuries via weightlifting and competitive sports. There is no disputing the facts that plague childhood athletics. A September 2018 systematic review found that injuries increase in proportion to sports specialization. However, few studies have linked the detrimental effects that any single sport has on the progression of spinal degeneration—until now. 

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Psychological, Social Factors in Chronic Pain: The Impact on Chiropractic Patients

The current opioid epidemic in the United States brings long overdue attention to nonpharmacological approaches to managing pain.  Among the recommended therapies for low back pain by the American College of Physicians, for example, are spinal manipulation, acupuncture, yoga and cognitive behavioral therapy.  While it may be clear why body-based therapies were recommended, the inclusion of a psychological approach, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, may raise some eyebrows. Researchers Margaret Chesney, PhD, and Christine Goertz, DC, PhD, explore how psychological factors play a role in the experience of chronic pain as well as what patients and their providers should know.

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Article rating: 4.3

Research Review: Non-surgical Treatment vs. Self-directed Care to Improve Walking in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is caused by age-related degenerative changes in older adults and is a leading cause of pain, disability and loss of independence. LSS is also the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. However, most patients are managed non-surgically, despite the fact systematic reviews of non-surgical management suggest unproven benefit for improving walking outcomes. This research review looks at a recent, randomized controlled trial designed to compare the effectiveness of a structured, comprehensive, conservative treatment program with a focus on self-management and improved walking ability to a self-directed program in improving walking ability in patients with neurogenic claudication due to LSS.

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Article rating: 3.7

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Techniques as a Treatment for Healthcare Provider Burnout

Burnout syndrome has been defined as a three-dimensional syndrome characterized by exhaustion, cynicism and inefficiency. It has also been described as the opposite to engagement, which is defined as energy, involvement and efficacy.  One aspect of inefficiency may be a sense of low personal accomplishment – an area often examined in studies on healthcare provider burnout. In her latest ACA Blogs post, VA resident Danielle Aslan, DC, explores how mindfulness-based stress reduction utilized in the VA for patients with chronic pain may also aid healthcare providers.

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Article rating: 5.0

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Research Update

With up to 10% of the population suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it’s important to keep up with new information about this disabling condition. A significant amount of new data has been published in the past quarter about the management of CTS. This ACA Blogs post by Tim Bertelsman, DC, will equip evidence-based chiropractors with a quick summary of the 10 most significant findings.

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Article rating: 4.3

Research Review: Hip Impairment and Chronic Low Back Pain in Seniors

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common pain-related conditions in geriatric populations and is associated with potentially significant functional decline. As pain conditions can coexist and contribute to poorer long-term outcomes, it is important to understand the potential relationship between CLBP and other pain complaints. The aim of this study was to examine differences in prevalence of clinical hip symptoms in older adults with and without CLBP. The secondary objective was to assess whether the presence of clinical hip symptoms was associated with poorer physical performance and health-related quality of life in this population.

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Article rating: 5.0

Research Review: Walking vs. Exercise for Low Back Pain

Current guidelines for the management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) suggest staying as active as possible and even increasing levels of physical activity, as reduced mobility can cause significant decreases in quality of life and overall health status. Walking can increase cardio-respiratory capacity, maximum oxygen uptake and endurance with a low risk of injury. As well, it is simple, accessible, and free. This review aimed to provide an up-to-date, specific systematic review and meta-analysis in order to determine the effectiveness of walking compared with other forms of physical exercise on pain, disability, quality of life and fear-avoidance in patients with CLBP.

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Article rating: 5.0

A Tale of Two Dentists

Reflections on Choosing Wisely During a Trip to the Dentist

Meeting over coffee recently, Drs. Christine Goertz and Michele Maiers discovered that each had recently been to the dentist. After comparing notes, they agreed that their dentists were both professional, friendly, conducted a thorough patient history, and performed an appropriate examination. Then both dentists wanted to take intraoral X-rays as part of the examination process. Armed with the evidence and knowledge about current American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines, the chiropractors declined the X-rays, based primarily upon concerns about unnecessary exposure to radiation and cost. From that point on, their experiences became very different.

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Article rating: 1.6

Q&A with NCLC 2019 Presenters: Dr. Robert Vining

ACA’s annual meeting, the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference, brings you cutting-edge, evidence-based education sessions featuring some of the chiropractic profession’s most respected thought leaders and content experts. Many sessions also offer continuing education credits. Here we pose questions to one of the presenters: Robert Vining, DC, senior research clinician with the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research. His presentation is, “Rational Clinical Decisions: The Diagnostic Aspect of Evidence-based Clinical Practice.”

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