Research - American Chiropractic Association

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Techniques as a Treatment for Healthcare Provider Burnout

Burnout syndrome has been defined as a three-dimensional syndrome characterized by exhaustion, cynicism and inefficiency. It has also been described as the opposite to engagement, which is defined as energy, involvement and efficacy.  One aspect of inefficiency may be a sense of low personal accomplishment – an area often examined in studies on healthcare provider burnout. In her latest ACA Blogs post, VA resident Danielle Aslan, DC, explores how mindfulness-based stress reduction utilized in the VA for patients with chronic pain may also aid healthcare providers.

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Article rating: 5.0

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Research Update

With up to 10% of the population suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it’s important to keep up with new information about this disabling condition. A significant amount of new data has been published in the past quarter about the management of CTS. This ACA Blogs post by Tim Bertelsman, DC, will equip evidence-based chiropractors with a quick summary of the 10 most significant findings.

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Article rating: 4.3

Research Review: Hip Impairment and Chronic Low Back Pain in Seniors

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common pain-related conditions in geriatric populations and is associated with potentially significant functional decline. As pain conditions can coexist and contribute to poorer long-term outcomes, it is important to understand the potential relationship between CLBP and other pain complaints. The aim of this study was to examine differences in prevalence of clinical hip symptoms in older adults with and without CLBP. The secondary objective was to assess whether the presence of clinical hip symptoms was associated with poorer physical performance and health-related quality of life in this population.

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Research Review: Walking vs. Exercise for Low Back Pain

Current guidelines for the management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) suggest staying as active as possible and even increasing levels of physical activity, as reduced mobility can cause significant decreases in quality of life and overall health status. Walking can increase cardio-respiratory capacity, maximum oxygen uptake and endurance with a low risk of injury. As well, it is simple, accessible, and free. This review aimed to provide an up-to-date, specific systematic review and meta-analysis in order to determine the effectiveness of walking compared with other forms of physical exercise on pain, disability, quality of life and fear-avoidance in patients with CLBP.

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A Tale of Two Dentists

Reflections on Choosing Wisely During a Trip to the Dentist

Meeting over coffee recently, Drs. Christine Goertz and Michele Maiers discovered that each had recently been to the dentist. After comparing notes, they agreed that their dentists were both professional, friendly, conducted a thorough patient history, and performed an appropriate examination. Then both dentists wanted to take intraoral X-rays as part of the examination process. Armed with the evidence and knowledge about current American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines, the chiropractors declined the X-rays, based primarily upon concerns about unnecessary exposure to radiation and cost. From that point on, their experiences became very different.

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Article rating: 1.6

Q&A with NCLC 2019 Presenters: Dr. Robert Vining

ACA’s annual meeting, the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference, brings you cutting-edge, evidence-based education sessions featuring some of the chiropractic profession’s most respected thought leaders and content experts. Many sessions also offer continuing education credits. Here we pose questions to one of the presenters: Robert Vining, DC, senior research clinician with the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research. His presentation is, “Rational Clinical Decisions: The Diagnostic Aspect of Evidence-based Clinical Practice.”

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Choosing Outcome Assessments for Back Pain

Patient-reported outcome measures quantify patients’ subjective symptoms and are often more in line with accomplishing patient-centered goals. Patient-reported outcomes can give valuable information to evaluate the success of a treatment plan and aid in determining a prognosis based on past response. They are also used by insurance companies for re-imbursement purposes, such as determining medical necessity. Chiarotto et al. developed a core outcome set for use in clinical practice with accompanying suggested measures for patients with low back pain.

Author: Zac Shannon
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If Not Bone Out of Place, Then What?

Learn ACA Survey Course Shows How Chiropractic Theory Has Changed and Where the Science Is Taking Us

For more than a century, chiropractic science—at least as offered by many chiropractors—was frozen in late 19th century medical thought. Because the founders spoke of “tone” and the “safety-pin cycle,” it became almost a rallying cry for many of the followers. But has chiropractic science advanced since that time, and if so, will chiropractors embrace it? Many of you have read my theory textbooks through the years, but have you kept up with our modern science? There is a new story to tell. The new story is based on solid science that dovetails nicely with science from related healthcare disciplines, and that places [the chiropractic profession] squarely in the middle of interdisciplinary recommendations for conservative spine care and positions us as a substitute for old-school use of opioids and back surgery--instead of putting us out on a ledge, preaching against interdisciplinary care.

Author: Robert Leach
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Article rating: 3.0

Chiropractic Education and Radiography Best Practices

ACA’s Choosing Wisely recommendations are consistent with X-ray guidance in today’s classroom and trusted texts.

In the past year, many chiropractors have discussed indications for radiographic examination with renewed interest. In particular, they have questioned the X-ray recommendations of the Choosing Wisely initiative, a project of the American Board of Internal Medicine that seeks to promote more effective use of healthcare resources. The recommendations are hardly revolutionary, and well in line with current radiology education. In my own final radiology classes, professors emphasized that what we learned was only the foundation of what we would need in practice, and a mere fraction of what our peers would learn should they choose to become chiropractic radiologists. The recommendations in Choosing Wisely are shorthand for what we already know. 

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Essential Skills for Managing Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness and vertigo. The condition is characterized by brief episodes of dizziness, nausea, and/or nystagmus triggered by head movement. Over 7 percent of the population will experience BPPV at some point in their lifetime and 80 percent of those patients will require medical treatment. Chiropractors are uniquely suited to differentiate BPPV from the similar-looking cervicogenic vertigo. Both conditions are very amenable to treatment; however, each is managed quite differently. Successful outcomes are predicated upon a solid understanding of both.

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Article rating: 5.0
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