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The ACA blog provides readers with information to help them advance their knowledge, achieve their professional goals and strive for excellence, while also creating a greater sense of community among chiropractors nationwide through online engagement and information-sharing with their colleagues.

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Editorial Policy: Posts published in the ACA blog are screened by the ACA Editorial Review Board and ACA staff; however, neither ACA nor its contributors, officers and staff investigate, endorse, or approve any statements of fact or opinion, which are solely the responsibility of the authors and sources of information. They are published on the authority of the writer(s) over whose name they appear and are not to be regarded as expressing the views of ACA.

 

A Heavy Subject: The Impact of Weightlifting on Young Spines

Is weightlifting safe for adolescents? No, well yes, okay maybe…in the right situations.  That is about as clear as it gets concerning the growing epidemic of adolescent injuries via weightlifting and competitive sports. There is no disputing the facts that plague childhood athletics. A September 2018 systematic review found that injuries increase in proportion to sports specialization. However, few studies have linked the detrimental effects that any single sport has on the progression of spinal degeneration—until now. 

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Research Update

With up to 10% of the population suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it’s important to keep up with new information about this disabling condition. A significant amount of new data has been published in the past quarter about the management of CTS. This ACA Blogs post by Tim Bertelsman, DC, will equip evidence-based chiropractors with a quick summary of the 10 most significant findings.

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Essential Skills for Managing Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness and vertigo. The condition is characterized by brief episodes of dizziness, nausea, and/or nystagmus triggered by head movement. Over 7 percent of the population will experience BPPV at some point in their lifetime and 80 percent of those patients will require medical treatment. Chiropractors are uniquely suited to differentiate BPPV from the similar-looking cervicogenic vertigo. Both conditions are very amenable to treatment; however, each is managed quite differently. Successful outcomes are predicated upon a solid understanding of both.

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