American Chiropractic Association > News & Publications > Publications > ACA Blogs
>

Research Review: Can Pregnancy-related Pelvic Pain Be Predicted?

Approximately half of pregnant women will experience pelvic girdle pain (PGP) during their pregnancy. PGP is known to lead to pain-related restrictions on physical activity during and after childbirth, and to have a psychological impact on their perceived health, sexual life and general quality of life. The authors of this study aimed to explore the differences in demographics and clinical characteristics at mid-pregnancy and the weekly amount of days with bothersome symptoms throughout the second half of pregnancy in women sub-grouped based on the results of two valid and reliable clinical tests (P4 and ASLR) at 18 weeks of pregnancy. The authors hypothesized that sacroiliac dysfunction and failing force closure diagnosed at mid-pregnancy could be used to predict a course of bothersome symptoms throughout the second half of pregnancy.

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Research Review: Non-surgical Treatment vs. Self-directed Care to Improve Walking in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is caused by age-related degenerative changes in older adults and is a leading cause of pain, disability and loss of independence. LSS is also the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. However, most patients are managed non-surgically, despite the fact systematic reviews of non-surgical management suggest unproven benefit for improving walking outcomes. This research review looks at a recent, randomized controlled trial designed to compare the effectiveness of a structured, comprehensive, conservative treatment program with a focus on self-management and improved walking ability to a self-directed program in improving walking ability in patients with neurogenic claudication due to LSS.

0 Comments
Article rating: 3.5

Research Review: Hip Impairment and Chronic Low Back Pain in Seniors

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common pain-related conditions in geriatric populations and is associated with potentially significant functional decline. As pain conditions can coexist and contribute to poorer long-term outcomes, it is important to understand the potential relationship between CLBP and other pain complaints. The aim of this study was to examine differences in prevalence of clinical hip symptoms in older adults with and without CLBP. The secondary objective was to assess whether the presence of clinical hip symptoms was associated with poorer physical performance and health-related quality of life in this population.

1 Comments
Article rating: 5.0

Research Review: Walking vs. Exercise for Low Back Pain

Current guidelines for the management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) suggest staying as active as possible and even increasing levels of physical activity, as reduced mobility can cause significant decreases in quality of life and overall health status. Walking can increase cardio-respiratory capacity, maximum oxygen uptake and endurance with a low risk of injury. As well, it is simple, accessible, and free. This review aimed to provide an up-to-date, specific systematic review and meta-analysis in order to determine the effectiveness of walking compared with other forms of physical exercise on pain, disability, quality of life and fear-avoidance in patients with CLBP.

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Research Review: Exercise Interventions for Cognitive Function in Adults Older Than 50

As any population ages, cognitive decline becomes more of an issue. Maintaining a physically active lifestyle has been shown to help reduce age-related cognitive declines and incidence of dementia. This research review focuses on a systemic review with meta-analysis summarizing the evidence specific to cognitive benefits of exercise for people over 50. Prior research has shown conflicting results, due in part to the use of restrictive inclusion criteria. However, the results of this review show promise for both aerobic and resistance training.

0 Comments
Article rating: 4.0

Research Review: Chiropractic Care and Sensorimotor Function Associated with Falls

Falls are a significant cause of injury, loss of quality of life, and even death in older adults and make up more than 80% of injury-related hospital admissions in individuals over 65 years of age. They are also the leading cause of death due to injury in older adults. The risk of falls increases with lower limb muscle weakness, gait deficits, balance deficits, a recent history of falling, or in individuals over 80 years of age. This study looked at the impact of usual chiropractic care on measures of sensorimotor function associated with the risk of falls in older adults over a 12-week period.
0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Research Review: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation

Based on case reports/series and case-control studies, an association between chiropractic neck manipulation (CM) and cervical artery dissection (CAD) has been proposed. However, questions remain as to whether CM is actually a cause of CAD, or if the relationship is the result of other extraneous factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the strength of evidence about whether CM causes CAD by performing a systematic review, meta-analysis and evaluation of the body of evidence as a whole.

2 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Research Review: Clinical Practice Guideline: Chiropractic Care for Low Back Pain

It is now well known that low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and that chiropractors can play a pivotal role in the management of this condition. However, the chiropractic profession can achieve wider acceptance and improved cultural authority, particularly within integrated health care delivery systems, by embracing and integrating current scientific research into our approach to evidence-based health care. It is in this context that this Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) was developed. The aim of this systematic review was to update and combine three previously published clinical guidelines, while answering this question: “What is the effectiveness of chiropractic care, including spinal manipulation (SMT), for nonspecific low back pain?” 

1 Comments
Article rating: 5.0

Research Review: Best Practices for Chiropractic Care of Children

Integrating high-quality evidence into our clinical acumen is a crucial aspect of the evolution of the chiropractic profession. However, we must also continue to respect and include expert consensus, based on years of clinical experience. Papers like this help us achieve this valuable combination! Dr. Cheryl Hawk and colleagues give us a great overview of the literature pertaining to chiropractic care for children, incorporating evidence and consensus-based advice you can apply in your practice…enjoy! -- Shawn Thistle, DC, RRS Education 

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Research Review: Biological Mechanisms May Provide Insight into Effectiveness of Spinal Manipulation

One of the most complex and misinterpreted lines of research in chiropractic and manual medicine is the immuno-physiological-endocrine (I made up that term, but you know what I mean!) effects of spinal manipulation and other manual interventions.  The research group out of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) in Toronto, Canada has done the bulk of the work in this area.  This Research Review discusses their latest publication, which had some very interesting results...enjoy!
1 Comments
Article rating: No rating
RSS
12