Research Review: Spinal Manipulation vs. NSAID (Diclofenac) for Acute Low Back Pain

The purpose of this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial was to compare high-velocity low-amplitude spinal manipulation with chemical treatment. In this case, the chemical treatment was diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory. The trial also included comparison with placebo. Considering the staggering impact of low back pain, the authors of this trial felt there were too few studies comparing spinal manipulation to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or placebo. They aimed to test patient satisfaction and function, time off from work, and rescue medication, specifically.

Monday, March 12, 2018/Author: Jeffery Williams/Number of views (1635)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
Categories: Research

Evidence-based Diagnosis for Low Back Pain

Health professionals from different disciplines use diverse diagnostic methods to inform clinical management for patients with low back pain. One person may diagnose someone as suffering from sacroiliac joint pain while another might classify the same patient with a movement disorder caused by poor muscle coordination. In a given circumstance, either or both individuals could be right or wrong. However, we can’t realistically discern this until we understand the underlying strength of the diagnostic tests we use.

Tuesday, March 06, 2018/Author: Robert Vining/Number of views (548)/Comments (2)/ Article rating: 5.0

Research Review: Clinical Practice Guideline: Chiropractic Care for Low Back Pain

It is now well known that low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and that chiropractors can play a pivotal role in the management of this condition. However, the chiropractic profession can achieve wider acceptance and improved cultural authority, particularly within integrated health care delivery systems, by embracing and integrating current scientific research into our approach to evidence-based health care. It is in this context that this Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) was developed. The aim of this systematic review was to update and combine three previously published clinical guidelines, while answering this question: “What is the effectiveness of chiropractic care, including spinal manipulation (SMT), for nonspecific low back pain?” 

Thursday, December 28, 2017/Author: Shawn Thistle/Number of views (1165)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0

Does Spinal Manipulation Affect Central Nervous System Pain Mechanisms?

Part of the Evidence in Action series by Palmer College of Chiropractic

Clinical guidelines for adults with acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain support conservative management with spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). Research shows SMT is comparable to other noninvasive treatments in reducing low back pain and disability with relatively low risk for adverse events. However, the mechanisms leading to pain relief from SMT are poorly understood. Identifying therapeutic mechanisms of SMT can inform treatment strategies and lead to more effective care. 

Friday, December 08, 2017/Author: Zac Shannon/Number of views (1094)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
Categories: Research

Go “Back to Basics” During National Chiropractic Health Month: Here’s How!

Back pain remains a persistent and debilitating problem for many people in the United States and around the world. News that the opioid crisis in America has been fueled in part by the overprescribing of pain medications for low back pain amplifies the need for the chiropractic profession to continue spreading its message about the value of a conservative approach to back pain treatment. To this end, National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) goes “Back to Basics” this year by focusing on overall health and injury prevention as key strategies in maintaining spinal health throughout a lifetime—and highlighting the growing body of research supporting a conservative approach to back pain treatment.

Monday, October 02, 2017/Author: Annette Bernat/Number of views (1715)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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