The ACA blog provides readers with information to help them advance their knowledge, achieve their professional goals and strive for excellence, while also creating a greater sense of community among chiropractors nationwide through online engagement and information-sharing with their colleagues.

ACA blogs! How about you? For ACA's editorial policy and guidelines for writers, click here.

Submit your blog post 


My Rotation Through a VA Pain Medicine Clinic

Part of a series on the chiropractic residency program in the VA health care system

Some of the most valuable knowledge you gain in the Veterans Affairs (VA) chiropractic residency program comes from rotating in other specialties. Within the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Stephanie Halloran, DC, rotates at both the West Haven and Newington locations. Thus far, she has spent time in rheumatology, physiatry, women’s clinic (primary care), neurology, pain medicine and the interventional pain clinic. Although she says each rotation has contributed greatly to her clinical acumen, in this post she primarily focuses on what she learned in pain medicine.

1 Comments
Article rating: 4.5

VA’s Chiropractic Residents Share Experiences and Insights: New Blog Series

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) chiropractic residency program reached an historic milestone in 2016 when each of the five sites received accreditation from the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE)—they are the first U.S. chiropractic residency programs to be awarded this distinction. The programs were also successful in many VA performance metrics, including recruitment of high-quality applicants, 100 percent graduation rates, high degree of graduate placement in VA and/or other hospital settings, and high satisfaction across multiple stakeholders. Consequently, in early 2017 VA transitioned the chiropractic residency pilot into a standing residency program. Two residents of the program will share their experiences through a new ACA blog post series. 
3 Comments
Article rating: 5.0

Publication Bias and Outcome Switching: Threats to Evidence Assessment

Publication bias is a growing problem in evidence-based practice. In the hierarchy of evidence, systematic reviews and meta-analyses lie at the top of the evidence pyramid because they are regarded as the most rigorous form of evidence for possible clinical decision-making. But publication bias can color the results of those reviews and meta-analyses in ways not easily seen nor understood. 

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Interpreting “Quality” and “Strength” in a Practice Guideline

Part of the Evidence in Action series by the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research

The American College of Physicians (ACP) recently released a clinical practice guideline for noninvasive treatments for low back pain. The goal of this guideline is to inform care decisions by systematically evaluating and summarizing available scientific evidence for treating acute, subacute and chronic low back pain. Many treatments used by doctors of chiropractic, such as spinal manipulation, superficial heat, acupuncture, motor control exercise and low level laser are included as recommended first-line treatments.

 

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating

Taking an Evidence-Based Approach to Patient Care

By now you are no doubt familiar with the concept of evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP). But what does that really mean for the doctor of chiropractic? How does one actually implement the “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of an individual patient” when that individual patient is on the adjusting table? It is not that easy, for a number of reasons. 
3 Comments
Article rating: 5.0
RSS