Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference

The 2019 Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference was a huge success. More than 160 members of the chiropractic, physical therapy and osteopathic professions forged a new spirit of cooperation and understanding during the Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference (ICSC), which took place Nov. 8-9 in Pittsburgh, Pa. Organizers of this first-of-its-kind event hope to enhance patient outcomes as well as increase integration of manual therapies for back pain in the wake of the ongoing opioid crisis.

ICSC was organized and hosted by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) with the support of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT) and the Academy of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy (AOPT), which represent three of the major provider groups of non-drug manual therapies for pain.  

Manual therapies such as spinal manipulation, physical therapy modalities, massage and acupuncture have received increased attention and support in recent years by major health care organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Family Physicians for their ability to effectively manage many cases of back pain and in some cases reduce or alleviate the need for prescription opioids. Research shows that back pain is one of the most common conditions for which opioids are prescribed. 

“The chiropractic profession was honored to take part in the Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference,” said Michele Maiers, DC, MPH, PhD, vice president of the American Chiropractic Association. “We are committed to working together with our colleagues in physical therapy and osteopathy to raise awareness and promote integration of non-drug manual approaches.”

“Providers of manual therapies have an unprecedented opportunity to positively impact the lives of millions of people who struggle with back pain. Together, we can find ways to improve what we do and to communicate better with patients. The Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference was an important step in that direction,” said Julie Fritz, PT, PhD, FAPTA, associate dean for research at the University of Utah College of Health, who helped plan the conference.